2019 Cardedu ‘Bucce’ Macerato

2019 Cardedu ‘Bucce’ Macerato

Regular price $28

Region: Sardegna < Italy

Grape: Vermentino, Cannonau, Nasco

Vineyard/Cellar Stats: Organic farming; granite soils with high levels
of quartz; Vermentino and Nasco are left to ferment on the skins for 2
nights. Cannonau harvest follows a few weeks later; grapes are quickly
pressed after only a few hours on the skins. The two tanks are blended
and left to mature in cavernous cement tanks for a minimum of 6
months. Bottled unfined and unfiltered with minimal So2; 12.5% ABV;
500 cases

Sergio Loi is a 4th generation traditional Sardinian producer, whose family winery from the early 900s has always practiced no chemical farming and minimum intervention in the cellar. The Cardedu [car-DAY-do] vineyards are located on the island’s Southeast, where soils are crumbling granite near the coast, a sparsely-populated area that feels lost in time.  Cardedu balances on that edge of being told-school but also thoughtful, especially considering today’s warmer climate. In the last few vintages – extremely hot and dry – Cardedu has made lower alcohol wines by picking earlier and careful vineyard management. The result, thankfully, isn’t hipster juice without terroir. Sergio says, it’s just wine that tastes more like the cool vintages he enjoyed in the ’70’s.  We love this.

And we LOVE LOVE his 'Bucce' (which means skins, as in macerated on
the skins / 'macerato sulle bucce').  This aromatic orange wine, which
is actually a pretty golden color in the glass, aromatic and very
drinkable: tangy yellow plums, sea salt, and dried white flowers float
on a backbone of coastal wild rosemary and sage.  Easy and not tannic
at all, this is an orange wine for everyone.  And for everything,
apparently.  Sergio likes to drink it with the infamous Casu Marzu, a
local delicacy -- a spreadable Pecorino cheese, made in the sheep’s
own stomach, that becomes extremely creamy due to a colony of live
maggots that act as an army of chefs with stick blenders. One eats
around the maggots apparently.   He says, "You need a wine that goes
down by the bucket to eat maggot-filled Casu Marzu, but also a wine
that has enough character to stand up to it."  Ok, we're not touching
Casu Marzu with a 10-foot pole, but you get the idea -- Bucce is a
wine with enough character to stand up to pretty much anything.

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